Archive for the ‘Pacific Islands / Oceana’ category

This week in Ecotourism (1 Sept 2017)

September 3, 2017

A few stories entered my awareness this week related to Ecotourism

A quick look at the state of ecologically aware travel around the world shows the planet emerging from the economic slump in some areas, coupled with an awareness of the need to protect vulnerable areas of the planet. A few highlights I found appear below:

Costa Rica - Carribean Sea - Parismina (Eco-Tourism)

  1.  From Fiji: In Fiji, the Momoan Park is going to become a center for eco-tourism, and ecotourism activities, according to an article published in the Fiji Sun.
  2. From India:  An article in The Hindu.com relates that in India, the Telangana State Forest Development Corporation has proposed projects specifically to attract visitors looking to appreciate nature and wildlife. The backwaters of Nagarjuna Sagar Reservoir in Nalgonda district have been acquired and a proposal has been submitted for transfer of land to the TSFDC, selected for fishing and views. Independent cottages, common dormitories, restaurant and other amenities would come up and a tourism circuit connecting nearby interesting places is planned, Mr. Mitra said.Another eco-tourism project has been proposed near the Kawal Tiger Reserve. About six acres of land would be purchased to serve as visitor amenity center for those planning to go on a jungle safari.
  3. From New Zealand:  A new aquarium and marine center will open in 2021, which has been designed to educate and provide information related to local eco-tourism.

    It is hoped this expansion of the Marine Parade aquarium will generate jobs, grow the local economy, creating a unique eco tourism destination, and deliver a landmark conservation center of excellence. The aquarium and center have a cost of $45 million, with a $7m investment from the council over three years, and the balance sought through a mix of private, and public investment.

  4. From Delaware, USA: An online newspaper in Delaware reported that various companies have different tours that allow tourists to gently observe nature.  Those include “floating yoga mats”, LED lit stand-up paddle tours, full moon excursion tours, and kayaking, on which tourists can observe wild horses, eagles, osprey, pelicans, herons, horseshoe crabs, jellyfish, and end up with a stop at a local brewery.
  5. From Indonesia:  The Asia Sentinel had a story about ecologically conscious travel in the rainforests of Sumatra.  It mentions the Hadabuan Hills as one of many locally-recognized conservation areas (according to the article, it is not a national park, a wildlife sanctuary, or anything else, just an unmanaged area that happens to contain some of the rarest wildlife in the world).  While discussing Sumatra and the effects of the 1997 World Economic Crisis, the article’s author also mentions the  “gargantuan and magical Gunung Leuser National Park”, which made me want to plan travel there right away.
  6. Thenmala_Ecotourism_bridge

“One could even combine a visit to Hadabuan Hills with a trip to nearby Lake Toba, the volcanoes of Beristagi, and a foodie trip to tasty Medan. [They] can even arrange for you to have some tuak or palm wine as you sit on your bungalow balcony watching bats flit against the stars.”

Sounds wonderful.

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Contact Attorney Robert Miller for any questions about international travel related to eco-tourism.

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Adventure Travel in Tahiti

February 28, 2016

I’m excited about my vacation to Tahiti in less than 30 days.  French Polynesia is an amazing, historically significant place on the planet.  As one of the last places to ever be originally habituated by humans, the country has been relatively unspoiled from the beginning.

After becoming a French colony, Tahiti became a center of ecological controversy for decades due to nuclear testing in the area.

The country consists of 130 islands scattered across the Pacific —a total land area roughly equivalent to that of metropolitan Paris and London combined but spread across a swath of ocean five times as large as France.

Tahiti has become more environmentally sensitive due to awareness of envorinmental issues, and concerns, like all island nations, of sea levels rising due to global warming and climate change concerns.

Three decades of French nuclear testing had led to increased atmospheric plutonium and radiation, several destroyed coral reefs, a landslide and related tsunami, and radiation poisoning found in fish in the area. (Source: http://canterbury.cyberplace.org.nz/peace/nukenviro.html)

Because of the isolation of the islands, there is little biodiversity in plants, most of which were introduced by the first Polynesians, and many others were introduced by Europeans centuries later.

On the limestone soils of the island atolls, desert-type plants are commonly found. On the high volcanic islands plant life is more diversified; ferns have conquered many hills and plateaus, whereas rainforests are established in the upper valley areas. On coastal plains coconut, breadfruit, and various fruit trees flourish.

No mammals are indigenous to the islands, but you can find feral goats, pigs, horses, cattle, and rats introduced by prior settlers. A fish called nato and a variety of shrimp are found in the islands’ freshwater streams. The marine life in the lagoons and surrounding seas is varied and plentiful.

Current tourism on the islands focuses on minimal impact sailing, snorkeling and scuba, hiking, and responsibly exploring the natural beautiful environment and surroundings of not only Tahiti, but all the surrounding islands that make up French Polynesia (including the Marquesas Islands.

Eco friendly adventure travel outfitters include the following:

http://tahitiecotourism.com/

http://www.adventurefinder.com/adventure-travel/french-polynesia-adventures/south-pacific-tuamotu-the-marquesas-islands-adventure-life-tidadlv5691.html

Having been fascinated by the artists that have lived in French Polynesia, and the amazing stories relayed by James Michener in the Pulitzer winning novel,”Tales of the South Pacific”, which became a popular Rogers & Hammerstein musical and film.

Look for more photographs and adventures coming up!

Up Mount Pinatubo

June 30, 2009

I learned today of a trip up Mt. Pinatubo in the Phillipines, which sounds interesting.

First there’s the terrain: a vast expanse of land reaching out of the horizon, strewn with hills, mountains, streams, rocks, pebbles, and boulders the size of cars. Then there’s the omnipresent sand, which gets into everything and everywhere else. Finally there’s the journey it self: Sixty minutes of bumping adventure, grinding 4 x 4 action, followed by 45 min to 1 hour trek. Raw, rugged yet beautiful, Mt. Pinatubo – the EASY Climb.

Rising some 1780 meters above the plains, Mt. Pinatubo made headlines when it erupted 1991, burning a path of devastation throughout Central Luzon. Now Mt. Pinatubo is again a focus of attention as an attraction for eco-tourist.

DAY TRIP ITINERARY

3 am Assembly at Cubao bus station for those who don’t have car to the site

6 am Assembly at Capas Tarlac for those who have cars

Sta. Juliana, for Department of Tourism Registration

8 am ETA in Crater, swim, chill, photo opps, lunch, boat ride